You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Georges Schwizgebel’ category.

Director: Georges Schwizgebel
Release Date: 1992
Rating: ★★★★½
Review:

La course à l'abîme © Georges Schwizgebel‘La course à l’abîme’ is a depiction of the final ride into hell from ‘La Damnation de Faust’ (1846) by Hector Berlioz.

The film consists of a very associative series of images, tied together by the two riders, Faust & Méphistophélès. Like in Schwizgebel’s earlier film ‘78 tours‘ (1985) we watch images changing perspective and morphing into each other, to stunning effects. All builds up to a spectacular finale, in which we see all the animation within one frame.

‘La course à l’abîme’is the first film showing Schwizgebel’s interest in classic European stories. It’s a clear precursor of later films, like ‘L’année du daim’ (1995), ‘La jeune fille et les nuages’ (2000) and ‘L’homme sans ombre’ (2004), in which he uses his stunning techniques for narrative purposes.

Watch ‘La course à l’abîme’ yourself and tell me what you think:

‘La course à l’abîme’ is available on the DVD ‘Les Peintures animées de Georges Schwizgebel’

Director: Georges Schwizgebel
Release Date: 1985
Rating: ★★★★½
Review:

78 Tours © Georges SchwizgebelIn ’78 Tours’ Schwizgebel uses his technique of rotating perspectives and metamorphosis, which he had developed in films like ‘Perspectives‘ (1975) to stunning effects.

’78 Tours’ is a short film set to accordion music, which uses circles as a leitmotiv, as well as coffee and a park. The film is completely painted, using deep colors and stark shadows. Schwizgebel’s unique virtuoso style really comes to a full bloom in this film, which must be regarded as his first masterpiece.

Watch ‘78 Tours’ yourself and tell me what you think:

’78 Tours’ is available on the DVD ‘Les Peintures animées de Georges Schwizgebel’

Director: Georges Schwizgebel
Release Date: 1982
Rating: ★★★★
Review:

Le ravissement de Frank N. Stein © Georges Schwizgebel‘Le ravissement de Frank N. Stein’ starts with very abstract images, which resolve into Frankenstein’s laboratory as depicted in the film from 1931.

After 1’40 we become the monster itself, walking through endless chambers and corridors and staircases in an almost computer animation-like long sequence of perspective animation. The rooms, initially filled with abstract shapes, become more and more complex. They contain more and more windows and human forms, and finally moving human forms, ending with multiple copies of the monster’s bride. In the end we watch the monster itself, in his depiction by Boris Karloff. he smiles at his bride, but she only screams…

This film, which is set to very nervous electronic music, is a very impressive study of perspective: we really feel we are walking. The film has a repetitive and dreamlike quality, which is enhanced by its surreal settings, reminiscent of paintings by Giorgio de Chirico.

Watch ‘Le ravissement de Frank N. Stein’ yourself and tell me what you think:

‘Le ravissement de Frank N. Stein’ is available on the DVD ‘Les Peintures animées de Georges Schwizgebel’

Director: Georges Schwizgebel
Release Date:
 1977
Rating: 
★★★
Review:

Hors-jeu © Georges SchwizgebelIn ‘Hors-jeu’ we watch a soccer match change into a basketball match and into an ice hockey game. When violence enters, however, the game stops.

With this short film Schwizgebel builds on the concepts introduced in his previous film, ‘Perspectives‘. In ‘Hors-jeu’ he incorporates sound-effects and a rather surrealistic play with the rotoscoped images into his style. Surrealism would dominate his next film, ‘Le ravissement de Frank N. Stein‘ (1982), but in its visual style ‘Hors-jeu’ looks more forward to later films, like ‘78 Tours‘ (1985).

Watch ‘Hors-jeu’ yourself and tell me what you think:

http://v.youku.com/v_show/id_XNzU1MjYzMjg=.html

‘Hors-jeu’ is available on the DVD ‘Les Peintures animées de Georges Schwizgebel’

Director: Georges Schwizgebel
Release Date:
 1975
Rating: 
★★★
Review:

erspectives © Georges SchwizAs the title implies, this short film is a study in perspectives. It also seems to address the arbitrariness of things, as we see a walking woman change into herself, into skaters and into a running dog, whenever our perspective of her changes. The film uses effective piano music by Bach.

‘Perspectives’ introduces several aspects of Schwizgebel’s mature style: the painted canvas, the rotoscoped movements, the constant changing of perspectives, the prominent shadows and his mastery of metamorphosis. In his next films Schwizgebel would expand on this technique, which would eventually lead to such masterpieces as ‘La jeune fille et les nuages’ (2000) and ‘L’Homme sans ombre’ (2004).

Watch ‘Perspectives’ yourself and tell me what you think:

http://v.youku.com/v_show/id_XNzU1MzkzOTY=.html

‘Perspectives’ is available on the DVD ‘Les Peintures animées de Georges Schwizgebel’

Director: Georges Schwizgebel
Release Date:
1974
Rating: 
★★★★
Review:

Le vol d'Icare © Georges SchwizgebelIn ‘le vol d’Icare’ a man wants to fly like the birds. In the end he succeeds.

More important than the plot, however, is the technique of this film, which makes use of huge pixels, giving it a very digital look. Even though the man and the birds are extremely simplified, their motions are instantly recognizable. Even more remarkable is that the film contains some kind of baroque feel, amplified by Louis Couperin’s harpsichord music.

‘Le Vol d’Icare’ was Swiss animator Georges Schwizgebel’s first animated film. It doesn’t resemble his later films. In fact, it doesn’t resemble any other animation film. But it already shows Schwizgebel’s originality and virtuosity, and it can be considered his first masterpiece.

Watch ‘Le vol d’Icare’ yourself and tell me what you think:

‘Le vol d’Icare’ is available on the DVD ‘Les Peintures animées de Georges Schwizgebel’

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