You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘fisherman’ tag.

Director: Sergei Ryabov
Release Date: February 20, 2007
Rating: ★★★½
Review:

The Tiny Fish © Soyuzmultfilm‘The Tiny Fish’ is a charming little children’s film with a winter setting.

We follow a little girl who encounters an evil fisherman catching a fish. Shocked by this event the girl stays at home, leaving it to other kids to play outside in the snow. She draws a picture of the fish and then dreams that she and the fish are attacked by a giant version of the fisherman, who grows bigger and bigger in size. With her paper fish the girl returns to the ice hole where the fish had been caught. She returns her paper fish to the water, which immediately comes to life.

‘The Tiny Fish’ is made with a virtuoso cut-out technique. The designs are soft and tender, if a little old-fashioned. The story is told without words, and with a great feel of atmosphere. The girl’s emotions are not shown all too explicitly, but one immediately feels with her. The magical transformation of the paper fish is in complete agreement with the child’s world of wonder.

Watch ‘The Tiny Fish’ yourself and tell me what you think:

‘The Tiny Fish’ is available on the Belgian DVD ‘Kleine helden & rare kwasten – 14 animatiefilms voor kinderen’

Advertisements

Director: Te Wei
Release Date: 1988
Rating: ★★★★★ ♕
Review:

Feeling of Mountain and Water © Te WeiAfter a hiatus of 25 years, China’s pioneering star animator Te Wei returns with this powerful and serene film, which is probably the most Chinese film ever made.

‘Feeling from Mountain and Water’* tells about an old master passing of the Guqin, a Chinese zither, and most revered of all Chinese classical instruments. Feeling his time has come, the old master passes his art on to a musical boyish fisherman. In the end we watch the boy playing an ode to his master and to nature on the guqin, which is now his.

The designs of this short are extremely beautiful, the watercolor backgrounds are on the verge of the abstract, and the animation is delicate and sophisticated. The film knows no dialogue, and much of the story is more suggested than shown.

Te Wei must have felt close to the film’s subject, as he himself was already in his seventies when he made this. Meanwhile, a younger gang of Chinese animators had taken inspiration from his films from the 1960s in what must have been a Chinese animation renaissance since the devastation of the cultural revolution.

‘Feeling from Mountain and Water’ is a very beautiful and meditative film on nature, music and life, and to me the masterpiece of Chinese animation.

Watch ‘Feeling from Mountain and Water’ yourself and tell me what you think:

‘Feeling from Mountain and Water’ is available on the French DVD ‘Impression de montagne et d’eau’

* this film is also known by its French title: impression de montagne et d’eau

Director: Hu Jinqing
Release Date: 1985
Rating: ★★
Review:

The Straw Man © Hu Jinqing‘The Straw Man’* is yet another example of China’s typical preoccupation with nature, water and fishermen.

Based on an ancient proverb (which one could translate into ‘it’s dogged as does it’), this film tells about a fisherman who is disturbed by two pelicans and who disguises himself as a scarecrow to catch the two birds.

The cut-out animation of the birds is very naturalistic, yet the backgrounds, based on paintings from the Tang dynasty, are are very graphical. Unfortunately, compared to the stunning animation of the animals, the animation of the fisherman is very crude and primitive, and the film suffers a little from a slow pace and all too present music.

Watch ‘The Straw Man’ yourself and tell me what you think:

‘The Straw Man’ is available on the French DVD ‘Impression de montagne et d’eau’

* this film is also known by its French title: ‘l’épouvantail’

Director: Hu Jinqing
Release Date: 1983
Rating: ★★½
Review:

The Snipe and the Clam © Hu Jinqing‘The Snipe and the Clam’*  is one of many Chinese films based on ancient tales.

And like many other Chines films it has a look based on ancient Chinese paintings, it’s set in nature, and it deals with a fisherman.

In this film, a fisherman, a kingfisher and a snipe try to open a giant clam. When the snipe gets stuck, it’s the fisherman who wins the day. The film is based on an ancient Chinese proverb, which can be translated into “two dogs fight for a bone, and a third one runs away with it”.

In ”The Snipe and the Clam’ Hu Jinqing excels in gorgeous watercolor backgrounds, beautiful designs, great silent acting and remarkably naturalistic cut out-animation of the animals. In comparison, the animation of the fisherman is simple and rather crude. The film unfolds at an unhurried, almost meditative speed, which can make it difficult to enjoy.

Watch ‘The Snipe and the Clam’ yourself and tell me what you think:

‘The Snipe and the Clam’ is available on the French DVD ‘Impression de montagne et d’eau’

* this film is also known as ‘Snipe-Clam Grapple’, and by its French title: ‘l’aigrette et j’huitre’

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 933 other followers

Bookmark and Share

Follow TheGrob on Twitter

Categories

Advertisements